Facts About the Human Body You Probably Never Knew



The more we learn more about the human body, the weirder it gets. We’re full of all kinds of squishy fluids, we got our start as a single cell, and we each have a skeleton inside of us. But the weirdness doesn’t stop there: Here are some strange facts about the human body that you probably never realized. 

 

BABIES HAVE MORE BONES THAN ADULTS 

Most adults have around 206 bones, but babies have even more. The average baby has about 300 bones. That’s because a lot of things that are one bone in an adult are actually multiple separate bones, joined by cartilage, in little ones. Take the skull, for example: A baby's “soft spot” is just the cartilage in between some of the head bones that haven’t fused together yet. 

 

WE GLOW IN THE DARK, BUT ONLY SLIGHTLY 

Humans are bio-luminescent. The chemical reactions in our cells throw off tiny amounts of light that scientists have been able to capture with ultra-sensitive cameras. You can’t see the glow with the naked eye, though — it’s a thousand times weaker than what we can detect. 

 

OUR APPENDIX ISN’T USELESS 

The appendix, that little worm-like thing that dangles off our large intestine, was once thought to be a mystery, a vestige of something in our evolutionary past. It turns out that our appendix is far from being a useless lump of flesh. It's full of tissues associated with the immune system and may serve as a backup storage site for our “good” gut bacteria. 

 

WE HAVE INVISIBLE STRIPES 

Tiger stripes aren’t just for tigers; human skin has a similar stripey pattern. We just can’t usually see it. Our stripes, called Blaschko lines, are formed as our cells are dividing and our body is growing in utero. These rows of cells, including skin cells, look identical and are thus not visible as stripes — most of the time. But certain rashes will follow the lines, making them visible, and sometimes they can be seen under powerful-enough ultraviolet light. 

 

OUR POOP IS LIQUID WHEN IT’S INSIDE OF US 

Even though food enters your body as a solid and leaves it as a solid, it spends most of the time in between as a liquid. Think about it: your stomach is basically an acid bath, and your small intestine is a thin tube, like a garden hose. There’s no solid hamburger making its way down the pipe; food in the process of being digested is a liquid called chyme. Only at the end of your former food’s journey is most of that water absorbed back into the body, leaving solid waste at the end.