Three Myths About Heart Disease



Over the past decade, we’ve learned a great deal about what causes heart attacks and how to prevent them. However, unless you follow medical news closely, there’s a chance you may have misconceptions about the risk factors for heart disease. Here are three commonly held — but mistaken — beliefs. Replacing these myths with truths can give you the information you need to plan the best path to a healthy heart. 

 

MYTH 1: IF YOU HAVE HEARD DISEASE, YOU NEED TO TAKE IT EASY 

For the vast majority of people with heart disease, being sedentary is a bad idea. It can lead to blood clots in the legs and a decline in overall physical condition. Physical activity helps strengthen the heart muscle, improves blood flow to the brain and internal organs, and improves overall health and well-being. 

 

MYTH 2: YOU CAN LOWER YOUR RISK OF HEART DISEASE WITH VITAMINS AND SUPPLEMENTS 

Clinical trials of supplementation with Vitamins E, C, and beta carotene have either failed to confirm benefits or were conducted in such a way that no conclusion could be drawn. The American Heart Association has stated that there is no scientific evidence to justify using these vitamins to prevent or treat cardiovascular disease. 

 

MYTH 3: IF YOU HAVE SMOKED FOR YEARS, YOU CAN'T REDUCE YOUR RISK OF HEART DISEASE BY QUITTING. 

The benefits of quitting smoking start the minute you quit, no matter your age, how long you have smoked, or how many cigarettes a day you have smoked. Only one year after quitting, your heart attack risk will have dropped by 50%; in 10 years, it will be the same as if you never smoked.